A Soviet Fallout Shelter Beneath Kiev

You know that gallery I shared last week, with all the photos from underground stuff in Ukraine? Well, that wasn’t everything we saw in those two days. Because we saw this place, too – a fallout shelter built deep in the earth beneath a military factory in Kiev.

The factory itself has changed hands now; no longer military, it’s owned by some flashy tech company who’ve installed their own security barriers and guards. Beyond those though, tucked away in a back corner of the staff carpark, sits the bulkhead entrance to the bunker down below.

It was amazing just how intact this place was. I’ve been in fallout shelters before – Soviet ones, too – but they’ve typically been stripped bare during the intervening decades. So here, once we’d disabled the alarm systems and managed to get inside, it was a rare treat to stumble into a timeless space filled with supply crates, medicine and gas masks, watched over still by dusty portraits of Lenin.

 
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