A Beginner’s Guide to Chinglish

The Chinese language works very differently to English. Their use of verbs and syntax, the rules for forming sentences, differ on such a fundamental level that the results of mixing the two can often be quite hilarious. The resultant juxtaposition of English words arranged according to Chinese logic is often dubbed ‘Chinglish.’

I’ve photographed some pretty entertaining examples of Chinglish on my numerous visits to China. This post is going to grow over time, too – as I’m sure I’ll be adding more photos with every future visit I make.

Chinglish 1-DR
My favourite here is ‘Sauce Pig.’
Chinglish 2-DR
‘No Squeeze Glass Attention. Be careful to slip.’
Chinglish 3-DR
I wasn’t brave enough to order the ‘Seafood Wool Blood Flourishing.’ I guess I’ll never know.
Chinglish 4-DR
‘Care yourself, do a healthy person.’
Chinglish 5-DR
‘Tackle the ticket booth.’
Chinglish 6-DR
‘No stirring animal’ – good, though not quite as funny as a sign I saw in Thailand which read: ‘Bright lights attack the Eye of the Tiger.’
Chinglish 7-DR
‘The boiler wraps up flesh.’
Chinglish 8-DR
I completely misread this one, then proceeded to freak out.

(Just by way of explanation, I later found out that this was a popular cabbage soup. Hunan province is famous for its sweet baby cabbages – the menu was not, in fact, advertising human baby soup.)

 

Chinglish 9-DR
In Qingdao, a former German colony, they’re even throwing a third language into the mix.
Support The Bohemian Blog on Patreon

The Exclusion Zone.

The Bohemian Blog is bigger than it looks. In fact, there’s a whole restricted area hidden away behind the public pages… a space where patrons of the site can access exclusive content, book previews and private image galleries. It’s called The Exclusion Zone. Just sponsor me the equivalent of a cup of coffee for each new article I post, and I’ll send you the password. Check out my page on Patreon to find out more about the perks of getting involved.

Post a comment